Dravet syndrome drug development pipeline review 2019

Dravet syndrome drug development pipeline review 2019

The 2019 Dravet Syndrome Pipeline and Opportunities Review provides a review and analysis of 12 drug candidates in development for the treatment of Dravet syndrome, including 11 products that have received orphan drug designations. The Report includes the most recent updates on programs from GW Pharmaceuticals (Epidiolex / Epidyolex), Zogenix (Fintepla, ZX008), Biocodex (stiripentol) , Ovid Therapeutics (Soticlestat, OV935, TAK-935), Takeda Pharmaceutical, Supernus Pharmaceuticals (SPN-817, Huperzine), Xeris Pharmaceutical (diazepam), Epygenix Therapeutics (EPK-100, -200 and -300), NeuroCycle Therapeutics (NCT10015), PTC Therapeutics (ataluren), Stoke Therapeutics (STK-001), Encoded Therapeutics and OPKO Health (OPK88001, CUR-1915).

What the CDKL5 Deficiency community can teach us about patient centricity

What the CDKL5 Deficiency community can teach us about patient centricity

I used to say that at the patient communities “we set the agenda”. It turns out we didn’t, we were borrowing the agenda from scientific meetings. The 2019 CDKL5 Alliance International Research and Family Conference redefined what a patient-centered conference truly is. In this article I summarise the elements that make a meeting truly patient-centered.

Clinical trials in CDKL5 Deficiency Disorder – 2Q 2019

Clinical trials in CDKL5 Deficiency Disorder – 2Q 2019

There are currently 4 clinical trials ongoing or about to start in CDKL5 Deficiency Disorder: ataluren, ganaxolone, TAK-935 and fenfluramine. This article is a summary of where we are with clinical trials for CDKL5 Deficiency Disorder for families and other interested readers including what we know about these four drugs, their efficacy, at which level of clinical development they are at, and where can you learn more about these trials.

Main Lessons from the World Orphan Drug Congress USA 2019

Main Lessons from the World Orphan Drug Congress USA 2019

Many orphan drugs are advanced therapies. Pricing and access are major issues. Epilepsy is catching up with gene therapy. We shouldn’t call them rare diseases, but frequently misdiagnosed diseases. Either we wait 2,000 years for treatments or we start thinking “many diseases at a time”, and online patient communities are now part of the drug development process. That’s the short summary of the main lessons I took home from attending the World Orphan Drug Congress at the National Harbor April 10-12. The WODC one of the largest meetings dedicated to the development of new medicines for rare diseases and takes place once in the US and once in Europe every year. In a bit more detail, here is the expanded list of what I would like to share with you from the conference.

Dravet syndrome gene therapy

Dravet syndrome gene therapy

There are multiple gene therapy programs in development for Dravet syndrome including those that supply and extra copy of the SCN1A gene and those that boost expression from the healthy SCN1A gene copy. Clinical trials are around the corner, with Stoke Therapeutics expecting to initiate clinical trials in 2020. Just Stoke is not enough. New corporate players, and ideally some precompetitive collaboration around the common challenges of validating clinical outcome measures and biomarkers, are needed to maximize the success of gene therapies for Dravet syndrome.  

Expected Dravet syndrome news during 2019

Expected Dravet syndrome news during 2019

2019 will be the year when we might have the European launch of Epidiolex, the US approval and launch of Fintepla, an ongoing clinical trial with TAK-935, hopefully some news about the ability of Translarna to improve Dravet syndrome by rescuing some of the nonsense mutations, and a year to prepare for the clinical trials that starting in 2020 will dominate the field: gene therapy approaches for Dravet syndrome that will treat more than just seizures. This entry reviews when we expect the main news about the Dravet syndrome pipeline during 2019.